6 comments on “Thoughts on Water Baptism

      • WHAT HINDERS ME FROM BEING BAPTIZED? BY STEVE FINNELL

        When the Ethiopian eunuch said “what hinders me from being baptized,” did he mean what hinders me from being immersed, poured, or sprinkled?

        Acts 8:36 Now as they went down the road, they came to some water. And the eunuch said, “See, here is water. What hinders me from being baptized?” (NKJV)

        Acts 8:36 As they were going down the road, they came to some water; and the eunuch said, “Look! Here’s some water! Is there any reason why I shouldn’t be immersed?” (CJB-Complete Jewish Bible)

        Acts 8:36 And , as they went on their way, they came to certain water; and the eunuch said, Look, here is water; what is there to hinder me from being immersed? (TBVOTNT-The Better Version of The New Testament by Chester Estes)

        There are no translations of the Bible that translates Acts 8:36 as…”What hinders me from being poured or sprinkled.”

        The only place water baptism is expressed as sprinkling and pouring is in books written by men. Do preachers, pastors, priests, and the early church fathers have the authority to change immersion to sprinkling or pouring?

        If preachers, pastors, priests, and the early church fathers have been given the authority to change immersion to sprinkling or pouring, then why can they not change water to olive oil or milk. The example of a man-made verse of Scripture. (Acts 8:36 Now as they went down the road, they came to some olive oil or milk. And the eunuch said, “See here is olive oil or milk. What hinders me from being poured or sprinkled?”)

        God has not authorized any preacher, pastor, priest, nor the early church fathers to change immersion to poured or sprinkled.

        God inspired one book, the Bible.

        YOU ARE INVITED TO FOLLOW MY BLOG. http://steve-finnell.blogspot.com

      • The problem with both of the Bibles that you use is that they are the only ones who translate the word ‘immersed’ instead of ‘baptized’. Both the CJB and the TBVOTNT are hack translation jobs. The second one even admits that Chester Estes imposed his theology in the text. All the rest of the translations rightly make no choice on the mode of baptized because no mode is implied,

        Sorry, if you want to make your point you really shouldn’t use rogue translations to do so who are in my opinion are no better that the New World Translation by the Jehovah’s Witnesses. Sorry just making stuff up and saying it is the proper translation is lousy scholarship.

  1. You hit the nail on the head! Rather than celebrating what unites us, way too many churches emphasize what divides us. Baptism has become a very divisive issue, so that while a Presbyterian church will accept the baptism of someone from a Baptist background, a Baptist church will not reciprocate and accept the baptism of someone from a Baptist background. I experienced that firsthand in a Baptist church I attended for a while. The music minister would have accepted my sprinkling baptism for membership, but the senior pastor wouldn’t, so I couldn’t be a member without being rebaptized – ie, dunked. The PCA church I now belong to accepts all modes of baptism as being valid.

    The pastor of a “Reformed” Baptist church I attended for a while said in one of his sermons: “Every time the word “baptize” is used, it should be translated as “immerse”.” On another occasion, he said “If I could get my head around infant-baptism, I would become a Presbyterian pastor.” I didn’t have the heart to tell him that there is more to becoming a Presbyterian than just infant-baptism. I was raised in Presbyterian and Reformed churches, my dad was an OPC pastor, and I have been a PCA Elder. Reformed theology colors my whole doctrinal beliefs.

    Since you only had six inches of water, you made do with what you had. I suspect that if you had had six feet of water, and someone wanted to be immersed, you would have accommodated their wishes.

    Even though I was baptized (sprinkled) at age 11, after completing catechism class, if I had the opportunity to do so, I would like to experience nude immersion baptism, as those in the early church did. that experience would tie me more intimately with the early Apostolic church.

    God bless!

    Steve

    • Actually the shallow water was helpful to one woman I baptized because she is afraid of deep water. Another woman stepped forward and wasn’t planned because she said I made baptism seem more like a natural part of being a Christian and not some huge deal where it is impossible to obtain. The man I baptized yesterday had been baptized as an infant, but he felt he should be baptized as a believer because it was his decision. It really was a great moment of freedom for all three of them.

      Blessings and Thanks for the comment.

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